MR Writers Club Prompt: What’s a 2017 Moment You’ll Never Forget?
12.01.17

Have you heard of the Man Repeller Writers Club? Every month we pose a story idea, you write about it and then send it to us (write@manrepeller.com) with the subject line “MR Writers Club.” We go through all submissions and post the winner on the first (sometimes last) Saturday of every month. Ready? Let’s go.


In high school, whenever I found myself furiously journaling about friend drama – usually a result of feeling left out again – I’d sooth myself by saying I’d scarcely remember any of it. “One day,” I’d think, “I’ll chalk this entire year up to one defining memory. All the detail will be gone!” It’s a notion I’ve always found comforting during hard times, and disconcerting during good ones.

In the decade since I graduated high school, this has proven eerily true. Even my most formative and interesting years are mostly chalked up to a single defining moment. Junior year of high school was the year I got braces for a second time (and cried for hours). Sophomore year of college was the year I got my heart broken for the first time. First year out of school was the time I became a professional dog-sitter. Woven into those 12-month spans were thousands of moments that, at the time, felt viscerally important. The fact that my hindsight glosses over them is equal parts sad and proof of the human survival instinct. A mind can only hold so much.

As we close 2017, a year that somehow happened inside a blink and stretched on for a decade, there’s a lot to reflect on. But knowing myself and humanity at large, the details will fade as fast as they arose. If you could jump to your future self and reflect on 2017, what would stand out? What was the defining moment of this year — not of the world, but of your life? What’s the memory you’ll never lose? Tell me about it in 500 words or less and send it to write [at] manrepeller [dot] com with the subject line “MR Writers Club,” by 12 p.m. EST on Tuesday, December 19th.

Meet you on the last day of 2017.

Photo by Patrick Demarchelier/Conde Nast/Contour by Getty Images.

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  • Adrianna

    Those who participated in the women’s march in DC know that there was very limited cell phone reception. I spent more time standing in one spot (over four hours) than actually marching. I truly didn’t know how many people were marching in Washington DC, let alone across America. I’ll of course remember the march – the Parks Service employees who told us to enjoy our day, the men who dismantled the inauguration stage wore pink hats and Black Lives Matter buttons. But most of all, I’ll never forget how I felt when I learned just how many people participated. I realized I wasn’t as alone as I thought I was. I started to unapologetically speak my mind. I predicted that the “shit will hit the fan,” so to speak, and we will speak out against institutionalized misogyny and men like Harvey Weinstein.

    Also, this moment was pretty great: https://www.instagram.com/p/BQ8vmfRAb83