I Tested 5 Celebrity Workouts and Sweat Through All My Clothes
12.06.17

When I signed myself up for the challenge of completing five celebrity-approved workouts and recording my experiences, I did so knowing it would be the kind of story that would write itself.

The workouts, on the other hand, were not so self-sufficient: I actually had to do them.

As someone who only medium-likes working out and mega-loves lying down, the heft of that reality weighed heavily upon my hamstrings by the time my A-list sweat saga came to an end. If you’re wondering why I pitched it to begin with, the answer is twofold: 1) I am prone to exercise ruts and there’s no better cure for a comfort zone than a looming deadline and 2) I maintain a glimmering hope that with the right sequence of tiny movements, I can have trapezius muscles identical to Gwyneth Paltrow’s.

With that gut-wrenching cliffhanger firmly in place, I invite you to scroll down and read about my Z-list experience in each class.


y7

Celebrity fans: Ashley Olsen, Bella Thorne and Zosia Mamet

Sweat level: 5/5

The last time I went to a class billed as “hot yoga,” I walked out halfway through because the room smelled like actual human carnage. I apologize for that rather pungent visual, but it provides important context for why I’ve been hesitant to try y7 even though I have friends who are addicted to it. You know who I trust more than my friends, though? CELEBRITIES!!!

And that’s how I found myself lying on a mat in y7’s Soho’s studio. The room was definitely hot, and I sweat a ton throughout the class, but much to my surprise I didn’t hate it. In fact, I actually really liked it — probably because instead of blowing hot air into the room, y7 uses infrared technology to heat your body from the inside out, which is why you’re able to reap the benefits of perspiration without feeling like you’re sitting under a giant hairdryer. The style of yoga was also different from other yoga classes I’ve attended in the sense that after the instructor leads you through a sequence, you’re given time to do it a few times on your own — or just chill in savasana if you prefer.


Ballet Beautiful

Celebrity fans: Zoe Kravitz, Natalie Portman, Alexa Chung…. and pretty much every Victoria’s Secret Angel in existence

Sweat level: 3/5

The actual bodily movements involved in a session Ballet Beautiful are quite easy — think teeny tiny motions no bigger in diameter than the flick of a wrist. Multiplied 100 times over, however, is where they quickly got really, really, really hard. I’ve never felt my inner thigh work so hard to lift my own leg again and again.

At one point, during the arms portion of the session, I protested (with a pained smile) that the weights were awfully heavy. My trainer, Yuki (the nicest smallest strongest person I’ve ever met), laughed and said, “They’re only one pound!” That was the moment I realized I probably will never have the stamina to be a Victoria’s Secret Angel. That’s okay, though. The class was enormously satisfying in an I’m-using-muscles-I-never-knew-I-had kind of way, the studio itself was a tiny chunk of white-walled heaven and, best of all, I got to play with a few tutus.


Body By Simone

Celebrity fans: Taylor Swift, Reese Witherspoon, Chrissy Teigen, Sandra Bullock and Anne Hathaway

Sweat level: 3/5

As a kid, literally all I wanted to do was bounce on a trampoline for 60 uninterrupted minutes. I was very keenly aware of the irony of this erstwhile desire when I somewhat nervously climbed aboard my “tramp,” as they call the mini trampolines in Body By Simone’s Trampoline Cardio class, and started to jump.

Nevertheless, once I got past the feeling that my pelvic floor was about to fall out, I actually started to enjoy myself. The sequence of tramp-based dance moves were tricky, but what I lack in actual skill I make up for in my finely-honed ability to simple jiggle around until sweat starts leaking out of my pores. I liked that this class was hard but not so hard I wanted to leave, or sit down, or rest in a permanent child’s pose. I REALLY liked how the trampoline made it easy to do moves that would normally irritate my pesky joints. My 7-year-old self would be so jealous.


Erika Bloom

Celebrity fans: Kerry Washington, Olivia Wilde, Jennifer Garner and Madonna

Sweat level: 1/5

I’m having trouble putting into words how delightful it felt to be looked at by pilates instructor Erika Bloom. Yes — just LOOKED at. With a simple head-to-toe glance, she somehow identified every microscopic imbalance in my body, and how each originated. It was like being put under an X-ray, except the X-ray was human eyeballs. Don’t ask me if I believe in Superman because after this encounter I might say yes.

The session itself was as fascinating as it was ASMR-inducing. Once Bloom took note of something that needed adjusting or correcting (i.e. my neck muscles, which could use some strengthening, or my pectoral muscles, which could use some loosening), she produced the exact exercise to remediate it. I’m not exaggerating when I say I could actually feel and see it working in real time. Even though I didn’t sweat at all, my body felt brand new by the end…that is, until I hunched over my phone to look at Instagram on the way home.


Tracy Anderson

Celebrity fans: Gwyneth Paltrow

Sweat level: 5/5

I saved this one for last because after seeing Gwyneth Paltrow’s sculpted form on the inaugural cover of Goop I could only assume her chosen workout routine would be challenging enough to make a layperson like myself want to crawl into the fetal position and ask kind passersby to squirt gatorade into my mouth.

The Tracy Anderson atTAin group workout class was challenging indeed — so challenging, in fact, that everyone comes prepared with not one but TWO full-size towels for sufficient sweat-mopping purposes. According to the Tracy Anderson website, their studios are “kept at a very specific temperature and humidity level to facilitate the best results,” which definitely explains the quantity of moisture my body produced, bolstered no doubt by the fact that the class was essentially a series of challenging aerobic moves performed while also somehow holding a plank the entire time, or so it seemed to me. After the 50 minutes were up, I felt swampy, satisfied and ready for my mud-covered photo shoot.


All said and done, despite obstacles instated only by virtue of my own laziness, it was a lot of fun to move my sack of skin cells in a whole bunch of unfamiliar ways. If I had to choose a favorite, I would say Erica Bloom’s pilates class was probably the most enjoyable and impactful, not because it was a grueling workout but because it actually felt like a form of physical therapy equipped to undo some of the inevitable damage wrought from sitting at a desk all day.

I would definitely go back to all five again — once I give myself enough time to forget what a plank feels like.

Feature image by Harry Langdon via Getty Images. Photos via Harling Ross. 

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  • Maggie Lanham

    Tracee Ellis Ross (I LOVE HER) also goes to Tracy Anderson and posts it on Instagram all the time – it always makes me want to work out! She’s kickin ass listening to awesome music and just sweatin it out. She makes it looks hard but also fun and then I go work out and realize it’s maybe just only kind of hard hahah

  • Adrianna

    I went through a Classpass phase for a few months, and I found that it was the only time I felt self conscious about what I was wearing – both based on style and how my body looked.

    I quit Classpass and returned to running on a treadmill and lifting weights at a local Brooklyn gym. I’m also no longer self conscious about how I look like in my ratty college alumna t-shirt

  • Adrianna

    I lost about 45 pounds by eating less carbs/sugar and using cardio machines at a $25/month gym. I went to a grimy, donation-based yoga studio 1-2 times a week. I got bored, and I wanted to look like my spin/barre instructor, so I quit and started spending a lot of money on Classpass and spin classes.

    I tried a variety of Classpass studios – even one where you work out on a surfboard. I quickly realized an insane amount of buildings in Manhattan are occupied by boutique fitness studios.

    But honestly, I was stunned by how much my self esteem plummeted. I was self conscious about what I was wearing and the fact that I wasn’t tiny. After 30 classes, I can firmly say that spinning is not an effective way to get in shape or manage weight. Let’s all be honest with ourselves and admit that barre is just stupid. I’m back at a low-cost Brooklyn gym, and I enjoy exercise again.

    • Eliza

      Boutique exercise instructor here. Any exercise you choose to do (and where you do it, wearing whatever you choose to wear) is like art -subjective to each individual. As long as you’re moving and you feel positive about it – who cares.

      • Adrianna

        Not to personally knock your chosen profession, but much like mainstream fashion, the fitness industry profits from perpetuating insecurities. Why do we feel compelled to spend $34 for a Soul Cycle class?

        • Eliza

          Not everyone works out because they feel insecure. Working out feels good and continuing to do it keeps that feeling afloat. If I quit my chosen profession tomorrow I wouldn’t be worried about my thighs – I’d be worried about my happiness. But! Like I said, it is all subjective 🙂

          • theysayshycity

            Agreed…I’m some eight kinds of miserable if I miss a workout. There’s also something I love about being in a room full of people trying to do the same thing.

            That said, I realize sometimes that I’m part of the problem…

          • Elizabeth

            I don’t work out because I’m insecure (though I don’t necessarily think working out for the sake of getting healthier/losing weight/looking better is inherently wrong). I work out because I like challenging myself – in many aspects – and I love being able to see actual, tangible results over time as the result of hard work. Running faster, lifting heavier, lowering my resting heart rate, or just getting more flexible. The human body is capable of so much and I think it’s so cool! Plus endorphins, and stress relief, and a good excuse to wear leggings.

          • Elly

            While that’s perfectly true, I don’t think Adrianna is saying that people work out because they feel insecure, but that the boutique workouts made her self-esteem plummet. It’s true, having been to classes, that different settings can feel very different. I do think the fitness industry uses a balance of insecurity and the joy of working out to sell fitness to people at boutique prices. The basic product is probably fine in all cases, people need to move, but because of the industry, the fact that the information is so different depending on who you talk to, and the amount of snake oil going round. I do powerlifting and I can tell you powerlifters aren’t impressed with Tracey Andersson, for instance. To a certain extent, anything with its own brand name is pretty suspect – Crossfit has its issues too.

            Most workouts sold specifically to women are basically bodybuilding but with the weights reduced to the point where you won’t actually bulk up, so you’re effectively trying to sculpt yourself like a piece of wood – that’s why something like Tracey Anderson is perfect for Gwyneth Paltrow who is a Hollywood actress with an image to think of, but not that fantastic if you’re looking to get fit and strong. I mean it’s better than doing nothing, especially for a beginner, but it’s putting a lot of time and money into something where you’d be better just going for a run or a walk or putting in 3-4 45-minute sessions a week with a heavy-ish barbell or kicking a ball around with some friends. But those are free or involve a one-time purchase.

            I do think when some classes make you feel insecure, like I experienced with an aerobics class and a kickboxing class, sometimes it’s fine and you can work through it. Like, if you’re learning a skill and you suck at it at first as was the case with kickboxing. I definitely want to get back into martial arts, and I know I’ll feel like a klutz at first. The thing with these boutique workouts, they make you feel alternatively too poor, too misshapen, too unfeminine or too… anything you’re not necessarily looking to change.

          • Kattigans

            I so agree with you about TA and had this exact convo with my friend who’s mom is obsessed with TA. Her mom is very much the TA demographic too – has major body issues to begin (not saying every TA doer does), is thin, wealthy, and lives in UES of NY. Like she is the TA crowd, and TA is so full of misinformation. I did her videos on Youtube for a bit and it was so exhausting just to get through it all because yes its hard but its also so repetitive and long. I agree that you can power through and get much better results weight lifting/cardio for 45 min x 3 times a week. Everyone’s body is different and so are their exercise preferences but thats my take on things .

            I’m like Harling, ,medium like to work out and max like to lounge. I’m lucky bc I was genetically given a tall frame and am thin but I was weak as shit and I hated that I didn’t have real muscle definition. I feel better when I work out because I feel stronger and that does help in my calming my insecurities. Also, everyone is insecure which is just human nature. And a lot of people do work out because they are insecure about their bodies. That’s not some big myth (@eliza) I mean its hard not to be as a woman when all day long we’re fed images of women who fit this “ideal”. Its really challenging to tune it out and deprogram from that. I know I feel a little more insecure after I see a pic of Emily Rajatkowski in her bikini and I consider myself a pretty rational person with this kind of stuff. Anyways, everything in moderation which includes exercise obsession.

          • Kattigans

            so agree with you about TA and had this exact convo with my friend who’s mom is obsessed with TA. Her mom is very much the TA demographic too – has major body issues to begin (not saying every TA doer does), is thin, wealthy, and lives in UES of NY. Like she is the TA crowd, and TA is so full of misinformation. I did her videos on Youtube for a bit and it was so exhausting just to get through it all because yes its hard but its also so repetitive and long. I agree that you can power through and get much better results weight lifting/cardio for 45 min x 3 times a week. Everyone’s body is different and so are their exercise preferences but thats my take on things .

            I’m like Harling, ,medium like to work out and max like to lounge. I’m lucky bc I was genetically given a tall frame and am thin but I was weak as shit and I hated that I didn’t have real muscle definition. I feel better when I work out because I feel stronger and that does help in my calming my insecurities. Also, everyone is insecure which is just human nature. And a lot of people do work out because they are insecure about their bodies. That’s not some big myth (@eliza) I mean its hard not to be as a woman when all day long we’re fed images of women who fit this “ideal”. Its really challenging to tune it out and deprogram from that. I know I feel a little more insecure after I see a pic of Emily Rajatkowski in her bikini and I consider myself a pretty rational person with this kind of stuff. Anyways, everything in moderation which includes exercise obsession.

          • Elly

            Oh, I’m definitely like Harling if I’m just working out as maintenance – and that’s the minimum I have to do because if I don’t my body just feels like a collection of bits that don’t make any kind of sense together. It’s like it’s not mine. Plus also I turn into a cabbage and it impacts every other part of my life and I’m shit to be around. So, when I don’t have classes or a gym to go to, I trick myself into working out, I decide I’ll half ass it or just do a bit and then just keep going once I’ve started.

            But I’ve found the crucial thing is to shift the focus and the competitiveness from getting a certain body, which isn’t an attainable goal as it’s probably someone else’s, to breaking personal records or learning new skills. That way, Emily Ratajkowski in a bikini doesn’t affect me, because my body is exactly as beautiful as what it can do, and ultimately if I looked like her, well, I wouldn’t be able to squat her. So, she’s doing her thing and I’m doing mine and I’m fine with that.

            My problem with a lot of brand-name exercise programs is that they’re not really relying on people getting past the point where they’re starting working out. When you’re starting exercising, any movement is better than none, and you’ll make good progress even with a relatively ineffectual workout. But with an ineffectual workout, you’re eventually going to plateau, or get frustrated at the point where you’re not satisfied with just flubbing through some over-complicated moves that don’t do much, which means you’ll probably give up.

            What I like about martial arts, on the other hand, is that you can always get better at punching/kicking people and defending yourself. Similarly with lifting, you can always perfect your technique and surprise yourself by getting stronger. With yoga or calisthenics, there are always more challenging poses to master. You’re not just grimly and dutifully making yourself sweat for 40 minutes as a chore.

            Exercise is sold to us as a palliative for our imperfections and no one is going to stick at that, it’s depressing. It’s a bit like how clothes are sold to us: oh, you’re short, you need to wear heels at all times or your legs will look wide, you need to make yourself look longer and thinner and taller or else cats will be like “mrawksssshhhh!” and run off into the distance when they see you coming and you’ll be a disgrace. Fuck that.

          • Kattigans

            My problem with a lot of brand-name exercise programs is that they’re not really relying on people getting past the point where they’re starting working out. –> so agree with this. I actually just started about a month ago doing these work outs on YouTube with this trainer named Rebecca Lousie. I’m kinda addicted to her videos bc 1) shes british and 2) they’re hard but only range from 10-15 min. I’m like you in that I trick myself into doing something and then once I start I get into and instead of doing just 1 15 min vid I end up doing 3.

            I feel the same way now about Emily Rakatkowski or any other girl like that. I’m doing me, and she’s doing her. Love your approach

          • Jeanie

            Agreed. Vanity motivates me a little I admit, but wanting to be able to move like a 30 year old when I’m 80 is a major motivating factor for me. I have permanent knee damage from poor fitness around when I was going through puberty, and working out is also a big way to remedy that.

        • Erin

          I like it as a treat- the bathrooms are nicer than any place I’ve ever lived and I feel like I’m treating myself but it’s better for me than going out to the bar. FWIW I am fat and don’t really enjoy the gym because I’d rather be lounging. Sometimes our boutique gym has deals and I snag them for me and my partner.

          • Adrianna

            I’ll give you that. It was a little jarring to return to a low-cost gym after working out at places like BFX and Fhitting Room

    • Cristina

      You should read Fitness Junkie, by Plum Sykes. It’s a giant satire about the NYC boutique fitness and health scene. It’s an easy and enjoyable read!

    • Aleda Johnson

      I am a tiny (but not slim) person, and I still feel like this. It’s like when I was in college and saw all the sorority girls in full makeup at the gym. Puh-lease! I’m not getting healthier around women who look down their nose at me because I have visible sweat stains!

    • Rebekah Jane

      I have to say, I enjoy boutique fitness – even though I do always feel like the lumpy one flailing in the corner. I’d rather have a group of women that I can observe and learn from along with an instructor who will physically move me into the right position rather than try to bungle through the gym solo, especially since I still have no idea what half of the weight machines actually do. The atmosphere of the place I’ve chosen also helps – the instructors are encouraging, the women are kind and I’ve made quite a few friends in class. But, it’s all about what works for your physical and mental needs!

    • Charlsey

      Different workouts work for different people. When I was doing barre every day I was in the best shape of my life.

    • Erika Galan

      Barre is not stupid.

      • Adrianna

        Man guys, take a joke

    • Amelia

      I feel you on this. I go to a yoga studio that’s not pretentious and not boutique, but my classes are filled with tiny, stick-thin girls wearing lululemon. I feel a bit bad being one of the biggest girls in the room in my TJ Maxx leggings but hey, I’m usually much stronger than those girls and I kick ass so it evens out by the end of class.

      • Adrianna

        I got way less judgement from the instructors about being new to yoga at the donation-based studio (Yoga to the People) than I did at the boutique studio. Ironically, I was paying $20 per class for some instruction/correction… I’ll always credit yoga for resolving my pinched nerve issue after my car accident.

        Obviously, there’s tons of instructors who are passionate about teaching, but let’s not deny that everyone has the “ugh, I didn’t want to do more work today” attitude sometimes.

    • erinsux

      I feel this, I joined my local Blink to keep my blood sugar down and so that I could walk for a long time without getting tired, and I like going! but as soon as I went to look up some exercises to try I felt like garbage bc it was weirdly competitive?? like, I don’t need to get THE SMALLEST WAIST WITH THE BIGGEST BUTT I just want to be healthy

      • Adrianna

        I’m so bummed I’m over a mile away to the nearest Blink in my neighborhood. I previously went to Blink NoHo for years. I found that I need to live within 5-10 minutes walking distance in order for me to actually go regularly. Part of the fun of Classpass was incentive to go to different neighborhoods around Manhattan, but commuting to exercise wasn’t sustainable.

  • Julia

    (Sorry for being pedantic, but: I assume you mean trapezius muscles like Gwyneth Paltrow’s, not trapezoids?)

    Glad to hear that the Ballet Beautiful class did actually feel like something — whenever I’ve tried an at-home barre workout the movements look so easy that I become too skeptical and switch to something else.

    • Rebekah Jane

      Pure Barre user here and trust me, those tiny movements get hard really quick. I started back after a 5 month hiatus last night and I’m feeling it everywhere. I’d recommend trying a few in-person classes so the instructors can help you ensure that your form is correct and you are moving the right muscle at the right time. It might look like a leg lift, but you’re actually supposed to be lifting your leg using your butt muscle, etc. Pure Barre sometimes offers a free class that’s 90 minutes and breaks down every movement so you can actually feel how it’s supposed to move in the workout.

      • Charlsey

        +1 to this! I do Pop Physique instead of Pure Barre but it’s the same thing. And the more you do it the more challenging it gets because your form is constantly improving

        • Kattigans

          I do Pop and its the only work out class I love doing. It was so hard when I started doing it 2 years ago and whenever I take a break and go back I feel it everywhere. The ab and thighs section are my favorite. You freaking feel it and ive seen so much improvement just in how much stronger I am with certain movements than before

    • Harling Ross

      yes i did! thanks — fixed

  • Camille Muson

    @Harling — did you wear your Allbirds during Tracy Anderson & if so, how was that?

    • Harling Ross

      i did! it was fine

  • Cristina

    I’ve never done barre, but I’ve done a rowing workout at a small studio and it was haaarrrdddd. I really hate rowing. I’m also going to try my “first time free” class at Orange Theory because I have friends who litearlly swear by it.
    I really enjoy spin class, because i can see the improvement in my longevity and stamina. But I REALLY HATE CROSSFIT. Like hate so much. I just personally don’t believe the body needs that much in order to make you feel better than other people. It was exhausting for no reason lol.
    I generally enjoy running as my long term workout! I hate those shirts that say like “cardio is for lazy people” or whatever that is. Hi, lazy person and proud of it! lol

    • Elly

      I’ve heard some pretty bad stuff about Crossfit. And generally it takes usually very technical movements from other sports like olympic lifting and has people do them as fast as possible for 100 reps or something. I used to work out at an oly lifting gym, those people spend ages perfecting a movement, doing it over and over again. You’re tossing a heavy weight over your head in an explosive movement, you need to have the technique down. So doing it as an AMRAP seems like a really bad idea unless you want to grind up your joints. There’s also stuff that I’d consider a test of fitness rather than an everyday workout – you don’t see boxers doing double-unders all the time, but with crossfit it’s like you didn’t jump rope unless it’s the thing that most people can’t do.

      And yeah I hate the whole quasi-eugenic, surviving the zombie apocalypse, “your workout is my warmup” bullshit, looking down on people who run. Those are definitely the kind of exercises I like to do, but, you know, do them chilled-out and properly.

      • Cristina

        Elly, I don’t know that I’ve seen you comment a lot on here, but your comments are so thoughtful so you should do that more often 🙂
        Olympic lifting was the only part I didn’t mind about Crossfit. But when you combine all that into fast paced workouts, it’s just like… Crossfit is what I imagine soldiers training for the Israeli Army go through. I just don’t need to know how to do all the stuff in my day to day life lol!! I remember one time we had to do something like 50 or 100 burpees for time. I quite literally, saw the light. I was like “I just voluntarily almost died” wtf.
        You have too google “Healther Land I Ain’t Doin It Crossfit” and then try not to pee your pants laughing. I’ve prob watched it ten times aahahaha.

        • Elly

          Yeah I read about those WODs and I’m just like, nope, not doing that. I think they’re definitely military inspired, as well: a lot of the WODs are named after dead soldiers. Having a prescribed weight for each WOD is also a military thing, I believe.

          Also for a start I can’t stand having someone encourage me all “go on, master your ass, keep going, one two three four!” when I’m working out. I’m already there, I’m working out! I like to get advice on form, stuff like that. So the crossfit mentality just irritates me. Did you ever read Gillian Mounsey’s article on her experience with Crossfit? She was a strength athlete before that, she describes being put on the paleo diet, losing a lot of mass and strength, and just, because she’s kind of a perfectionist, powering through workouts long past the point where she should have probably stopped. In fact I’ve heard of crossfit coaches encouraging that. Though there was a lot of controversy around it a few years ago (it got a reputation for people getting rhabdomyalysis) so it cleaned up its act a bit.

          But mostly it just strikes me as not a terribly effective workout. Even someone like Annie Thorisdottir, who’s a lifelong athlete and a gymnast, you watch her doing a gazillion reps of thrusters and she’s just making circles with the barbell after a while. And if her form slips, what’s it going to be like for us simple mortals?

        • Elly

          As for what the Israeli army do, I believe that’s krav maga, I had a kickboxing instructor who did that, it sounds pretty crazy – unlike most martial arts you would take classes for, it’s actual military CQC designed to immobilise and hurt potential attackers. He told me crotch blows are not only accepted but positively encouraged and commonly used. I looked up a demonstration on YouTube and he definitely wasn’t exaggerating!

    • JuiceBoxFox

      I swear by OrangeTheory and now my husband (a lifelong gym addict) does too! It’s not boring, it’s very challenging, and best of all I saw muscle definition in my arms and abs for the first time in my life. I’ve also made quitea few new friends and the friendly/upbeat vibe really does a lot for a girl in a new city. Have fun 🙂

  • theysayshycity

    TBH, I’m not sure that this article is finished until you visit Dogpound

    • Harling Ross

      i’ve been once and i don’t think i can ever go back…

  • Marisa Schwarz

    trapezoids!? lol

  • I have a pilates instructor that I see 2 times a week (private duo with my sis, and in class). It has completely changed how I look and feel – I feel so much stronger than I did when I was a college athlete, and much more aware of my muscles, posture, and ab strength. While there’s still a lot of room for improvement, I feel really happy to be sticking with it!

    However, I have been REALLY curious about Tracy Anderson, for, like, ever! Did you feel like it was something that would get you really fit? I like that her moves are pretty unconventional and more dancing. Do you think it’s only worth doing in the class, or would a at-home video suffice? I probably should just try it!

    http://www.shessobright.com

    • Also, I forgot to mention, I’m sad you didn’t do any Jane Fonda – I really thought that’d be on the list!

      • Kattigans

        Hey @she’s so bright, I did TA videos on Youtube for a while and wasn’t really a fan. I like pilates and barre way more as well as just going to the gym. The movements are very hard, and almost hard to the point of incapable of doing them which I guess you work up to but she doesnt even show moderations of how you can work up to them (like how they would do in yoga). I also don’t like TA’s philosophies and what she espouses about exercise and women’s bodies. I think she’s really toxic and spews a lot of misinformation especially about diet and weight training for women. That’s just my take. I’ve never been to a class of her’s and never would go.

        • Thanks for sharing! Yeah, my concern with classes is that the trainers don’t usually check for proper posture and things like that, making it easy to get injured. I could see that being the case in a TA class for sure. I’m not as familiar with her philosophies on women’s bodies, but I can imagine working with celebrities in that industry will do some of that.

          • Kattigans

            She espoused crazy stuff even before she hooked up with GP. I think working out at a gym or doing pilates/weight training is better than doing any TA related exercise. That’s just my opinion though

  • Frazier Sandlin

    I have never self-recognized with a sentence more in my life than “someone who only medium-likes working out and mega-loves lying down.”

    • Kimbones

      Lying down is the freaking best. I mean, I am a fan of standing up, but lying down has got it all.

  • Nora

    Alex Guarnaschelli is also a huge fan of Tracy Anderson. I have Tracy’s Happy Hour workout DVD. I’ve used it only a handful of times 🙁 For me, because I get bored from exercise, the best thing is YouTube. There are so many different types of workouts on there that no matter my mood or time I have to dedicate to it, I can find something!

  • Kattigans

    Omg Harling you just summed me up in one sentence: “As someone who only medium-likes working out and mega-loves lying down”. Mega loves lying down haha my boyfriend actually thinks I have a problem bc I’m so lazy. Like I love being in bed and just being a big sausage roll wrapped in comfort.

    But i do make myself work out bc ya know exercise. Its like doing homework for me, I know I have to do it and is good for me but I swear when it comes time I just mentally put up every excuse and blockade and then in the end when its done I’m usually like “well that wasn’t so bad”

    • Kattigans

      Also Harling, two recommendations:

      1) Try pop physique, its the only exercise class ive tried and actually really liked and its affordable bc either class pass or they have flash sales all the time if you sign up on their mailing lists. The sales make the bundles worth it. The classes are also hard! And I feel like I sweat but not in a disgusting amount. I’ve been going on and off for 2 years. Love it, always come back and feel good when I do

      2) Try Rebecca Louise on YouTube. She’s the british trainer and I love her! Her videos are 15 min and you will feel it and see results! I do these at home and feel good after. I like the tiny waist vid, victoria secret legs vid, toned arms and abs + glutes. Plus she has a cute dog named Alfie

  • Jeanie

    I just started weighing training at a small gym. The style is called 5×5. After years of doing home workouts, I now understand the hype with weights! It’s great cause there’s now a whole different type of “weight” you care about, and the goal is to get that number up! It’s really nice to have something else to track your progress besides the scale or measuring tapes. My favorite cardio is dance, and more people should try it! It’s a workout for your brain too, because you have to focus to learn the moves.

  • leilanigl

    Here. For. This. Really interesting discussions too, I’ve been floundering a lot and needed some ideas. I just joined a cheap gym with my sister, because otherwise I just waste my yoga membership and boulder semiregularly for my wrists/hands, and I need a better routine.