5 Fall Trends That Are Going to Blow Up, According to Zara
09.06.17

I don’t believe in psychics or their ability to predict the future. I do, however, believe in Zara. Whether or not you’re a fan of fast-fashion, its foremost retailer has an uncanny ability to identify the exact trends that are going to go gangbusters every season and mass produce them accordingly (at a comparatively-low price point).

It’s easy to capitalize on a trend once it’s already very clearly trendy, but recognizing the viral potential of something before it becomes ubiquitous is another kind of magic entirely. That’s what Zara does best: It doesn’t just pinpoint the trend, it makes it wearable enough to go from niche to explosive.

If you’re curious about the biggest trends for fall, don’t waste your time looking for predictions on Google. Zara is the one and only Boolean operator you need. Below, five things you and everyone you know will soon be craving like the sartorial version of unrefined sugar, probably in a matter of weeks:

1. Red knee-high boots

The seed for this particular trend was no doubt planted last winter. Over-the-knee boots and ankle boots were starting to feel stale, and Isabel Marant, whose knack for serendipitous footwear timing is eerie, staked a claim on what was clearly fertile ground with a pair of cherry red, knee-high boots that featured a subtle mid-heel. I scoured the internet for a cheaper version and finally settled on these suede ones from Yoox. I guess I should have waited six months because Zara’s are a delight and cost $160.

2. Polka-dot tops

Jacquemus lit the fuse when it debuted a puffy-sleeved, polka-dot top in its Spring/Summer 2017 collection, which effectively conjured up images of that iconic Princess Diana outfit. The quiet wildfire was then fanned by Balenciaga and Loewe Fall/Winter 2017. I tried counting all the polka-dot top options currently brewing at a Zara near you but lost track because there are SO MANY. Seriously. I think I flagged at least six. I want all of them.

3. Semi-tacky belts

The good kind of tacky, though, by which I mean loud and exuberant but not at all garish. Balenciaga and Nina Ricci alerted me to the revelation that this admittedly fine line was, in fact, tread-able via their respective Spring/Summer 2017 and Fall/Winter 2017 collections. I haven’t worn a “statement” belt since I was in high school and actually swore off belts entirely shortly thereafter because they reminded me of moms trying to be cool, but suddenly they feel more like a guilty pleasure that I don’t need to feel guilty about. The $40 Zara price tag probably helps.

4. The NEW bucket bag

Just when you thought you were getting sick of bucket bags, a new sheriff galloped into town and amounts to something I would classify as a maximalist take on the minimalist favorite. Quietly pioneered and proliferated by the likes of Danse Lente, Carolina Santo Domingo, Lotuff, Trademark, Hayward and Proenza Schouler, the volume on this trend is about to get really, really loud. MARK MY WORDS. (Yes, that loud).

5. Cropped plaid trousers

If I were to describe the particular silhouette of this burgeoning trend to an alien from outer space, I would liken it to a stockbroker’s pants, if said stockbroker mysteriously grew six inches overnight and all of her trousers were suddenly a bit too short. Does that make sense? Regardless, it’s about to be everywhere.

Now put down that crystal ball and give your bicep a break.

Photos via Zara. 

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  • tmm16

    Ugh I want everything. I have such a love and hate relationship with Zara. This time, the love is #winning.

  • Hmm. I dunno if I’m feeling any of these trends, actually!! I think they all feel a little bit “done” to me.

  • Imaiya Ravichandran

    can someone take those boots on a test walk and lemme know if theyre comfy? cause if they are, im so there

  • i can only accept the plaid trousers. Maybe the polka dots.

    • I wholeheartedly agree!

    • Hayley

      Same on the trousers, not sure about polka dots…I only like them if they’re micro polka dots.

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  • Alexa M

    also BERETS

  • Leandra Medine

    slouchy is an important detail re boots too!

    • Harling Ross

      2 true

  • Hannah Betts

    LOVE “semi-tacky belts”. Genius designation.

  • frannypaul

    I have to say they have a velvet embroidered bucket bag with asymmetrical straps for a sly loop close/handle that is sweet to look at. Probably would be a huge pain in the ass, though. But, fashion.

  • This is all well and good, but can someone please tell me what lipstick the Zara babes are wearing?! https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/1de0fcf80acca78cb17161a3cea5b48e99bbc4be988f55d6016a776c65cba5c5.png

    • Bea

      If I had to choose from my huge collection of red lipsticks, I’d say Ruby Woo by MAC is quite similar.

    • Kate

      Ruby Woo is similar, but it looks a little darker – I have a NARS color called Olivia that’s almost dead-on!

      • I’m actually wearing Ruby Woo today and this secret Zara shade looks darker for sure! I’ll go test Olivia, thank you for reply!

    • 808kate

      I’ve been wondering this FOREVER! I hope someone knows!!

      • I haven’t tested NARS Olivia yet but I did try Charlotte Tilbury’s matte liquid lipstick in Screen Siren and it was very similar to the Zara pic!

    • Ellen

      I just got NARS Matte Velvet Lip Pencil in Consuming Red in a bid to get this look for myself. That’s my biggest takeaway from Zara this season, is that this is THE makeup look I want/need!

      • my takeaway from this chain thus far is: NARS!! Hopefully Zara’s MUA will read this one day and solve this mystery once and for all… 🙂

  • I’m all about the polka dots, way less about those belts. I believe I used to have a few of those from Wet Seal back in the day.

  • Paola GP

    Those belts are screaming “YOU’LL WEAR ME ONCE, BUT IT WILL BE WORTH IT!”

    • Harling Ross

      hahahah

  • Natalia Soto

    so ready for stockbroker pants to be in so i can finally be the cool trendy teen i know i’m destined to be.

  • Pterodactyl111

    I love polka dots!!!

  • Kathy Ebel

    Red boots. Over before they began. Thanks, fast fashion!

  • Vanessa C

    OK the fashion belts I’m not ready for yet – I think I still have some from high school lurking in a stowed-away box somewhere in my mom’s garage with “do not donate” on it. Although, I guess I was holding onto them for a time when they would be back!
    And that burgundy bucket bag from Zara – is it me or is that super chic? Like I thought it was Celine at first. Wish it were leather!

  • Paige Locke

    You guys ! the thick belts were everywhere in Tokyo this summer. Seriously, it’s gonna be a thing. We’re gonna start belting again, I’m convinced.

  • Andreina

    Agreed on the bucket frenzy!
    The Row semi-bucket bag is a MUST as well

    • Harling Ross

      love a semi

  • chouette

    Eugh guys… Zara is actually the worst. It’s all knockoffs, and it’s all made under questionable conditions. So much stuff is accessible on markdown these days and the styles are not changing THAT much to be fair – Balenciaga has been running that spandex dress for 2 years now, if you actually love the style, save up and get one on sale. If you just need a spandex dress to hit that trend… do you actually like it? Do you see yourself wearing it in two years, or do you know you’re gonna throw away two more pounds of polyester (PLASTIC!) away as soon as it gets too cold to wear it? There are HUNDREDS of vintage wool suits around that you can purchase, dryclean, AND tailor for less than the price of a jacket from Zara, and you might get more than two wears out of it before the buttons fall off and it pills apart to shreds in the armpits.

    • Lizlemon

      Yes to all of this!

    • Marielle Nicol

      Agreed… One thing I would love to see more of on MR is sustainable fashion. However, my next thought is always oh no, that’s not what they’re about, they’re strictly about making the outfits fab, regardless of whether the skirt is Chanel and the top is from the thrift store. Now, I for one quite like this mix of high and low, but I think it’s important for a company with such a large influence as MR to be conscious of all perspectives in the fashion world… Don’t get me wrong, I love MR, but I don’t think I’ve ever come across an article touching on anything regarding fast fashion, design plagiarism, poor work conditions, need I say that the fashion business is the second most wasteful industry in the world… Have you? xo

      • B4B

        They did actually write an article a few years back on this http://www.manrepeller.com/2014/03/zara-spring.html…it’s actually more of debate prompt for the comments section on zara’s design plagiarism..but I definitely agree with maybe seeing more sustainable fashion pieces, specifically at affordable prices.

        • chouette

          I’d love to see more of it, too. I think we’ve gotten too used to fast fashion prices so now things that actually are made sustainably seem super expensive, when it’s really the built in cost of better materials, fair wages (store markups!) etc…

          • Fereshteh-Faith Oftadeh

            That’s not really true. For example, needsupply has a few brands that are made sustainably and are cheap as shit in quality. sustainability and quality are not mutually exclusive.

          • chouette

            If you’re using sustainable practices to make cheap quality goods that don’t hold up, you’re not really making sustainable goods.

          • Jessica

            I’ve heard really good things about the company Everlane. I haven’t done much research on them myself but they seem to try to be transparent in how they produce their clothes. And their styles have a beautiful classic feel to them which should make them last (providing they are of good enough quality to physically last, which they appear to be.)

          • B4B

            Love Everlane, but sadly the cuts cater to taller people :/. There’s also this company called Grana that has great quality ethically made clothing for surprisingly lower prices than Everlane!

          • Fereshteh-Faith Oftadeh

            k…again, I disagree with you. There really isn’t a universal definition of what “sustainable practices” really mean but, the assumption that quality and practice equals sustainability is sadly 100% wrong. You can, in fact, have a sustainable clothing company that manufactures clothing (or any other good) that is marketed and used in the most sustainable manner possible thus taking into account both environmental and socio-economic aspects and still produce poor quality goods for an array of reasons such as say, expenses? Budget? Profit? Take this example, manufacturing is the U.S. is almost the most well advanced when it comes to environmental protections although the US’s EPA enforcement has yet to be perfected, it is far more distinguished than countries in Asia, where rivers in garment manufacturing districts are destitute with foamy, poisonous runoff. HOWEVER, there’s a catch: U.S. garment manufacturing is not only much more expensive, because of minimum wage laws, it also has a reputation for fashion industry insiders for being poor quality. There is a large amount of innocent and ethical fashion startups that have fought a financial battle to produce in the U.S. although they very likely received a lot of adverse reactions from their customers for the inconsistent, poor quality goods, such as certain brands on Need Supply in my case. As a result and also as a means to survive and keep a job and provide jobs, these companies finally give up and revert their production to countries in Asia like China or Vietnam or Spain or Central America, where higher quality accessories and garments made for a lower prices are actually attainable. Another possibility is they simply found success and can not longer handle New York’s or LA’s manufacturing capacity. Would you call those people contributors to fast fashion or unsustainable? I wouldn’t think that’s really fair, do you?

            Another consideration is that wages in China are actually to a point where it’s midrange, upscale and some “luxury” clothing is being manufactured there. China has actually made the transition and put in the money to invest in reliable technology which is necessary to produce sophisticated quality clothing and other goods. Some larger ethical, sustainable brands struggle with this fact, because they have found there are actually responsible factories there, and yet their customers are bothered at what is perceive as a greedy or unethical choices. Yes, the environmental protections are still not great in China, but if you flip a tag over and see “made in China” you can no longer assume that it represents the bottom of the barrel.

            I think we’ve established already that we don’t, as consumers, always know the most eco-friendly choice. It’s hard to keep up with all the information coming out of the very fast paced industry. Is Balenciaga good or bad? Is Nike good? what about H&M? Or in this case, the most hated of all, Zara?

            yeah its shocking! fashion contributes to rainforest deforestation? there are actual sweatshops in Los Angeles? Vegan leather can be toxic because its synthetic? Natural fibers can be toxic, too? Plus, 98% of what we are presented with is not eco-friendly. We have to make ourselves impervious to advertising and seek out the eco-friendly choice, which is MUCH easier said than done.

            I just don’t think conscious, sustainable consumerism is a real thing and it just DOES NOT work and there is no alternative. No, Forever21 nor Zara isn’t going to stop selling clothes because of comments on instagram, frankly, they don’t give a fuck about what you think. The power lies with government and multinationals. There’s just no legislation proposed that you can call your representatives about. You can probably try and donate to Greenpeace and NRDC since a small part of their funding attempts to fix fashion, but there’s really nothing else. The only way this will improve is if more companies join the Sustainable Apparel Coalition, the corruption stops within governments in Southeast Asia and those same governments actually invest in infrastructure, Western governments figure out how to incentivize and legislate sustainable fashion practices into the norm, and relevant NGOs start attacking these issues with the same brutality as they’ve done with other environmental issues. What are our incentives? We have capitalists incentives and no incentive for innovation, protection and change in the governmental structure. Nihilistic or not, its the truth.

            Which is all to say, you’re not singlehandedly saving the world with your smart fashion choices and it’s really not a bad thing that Man Repeller featured Zara in one of their posts.

            And on a last and really important note, are you even considering what will happen those women who work in the garment industry in Asia if the US reshored all of it’s manufacturing? Although exploitative, dangerous and unethical as they may be, they are in fact an improvement from rural poverty and forced marriages for a large amount of these women. Those jobs are actually blessings for some – not in every country and not all women – but a large amount that is actually worth considering. Again, what are our incentives? Our incentive should not be to completely abandon Asia entirely, but to somehow figure out how to improve the working conditions and wages in these countries.

      • Greta Høvring

        I don’t think there is one ‘right’ answer on sustainable fashion, but I think this article serves us an acceptable option when it comes to having a relationship with both fashion and sustainability. http://www.stylewise-blog.com/2017/08/why-i-quit-being-ethical-purist.html?m=1

        • Marielle Nicol

          That’s an awesome article and super cool blog! Thank you!

          ps I am totally guilty of just throwing around that made up fact about the fashion industry… oopsies!

          • Greta Høvring

            Yeah, the widespread distribution of false information becomes the fact.. anyhow, if you are interested in reading blogs on sustainable fashion, I recommend my favourite, ecocult.com. She really does her research on the topic and at the same time gets through the message that also sustainable fashion can be fun and stylish!

    • Jules

      what a good comment!! I really like your point about buying things based on whether you actually like them or not, and not just buying into the trend! because sometimes I see things popping up on instagram or whatever, and while at first I’m like “damn that’s not a good look” after I see it a zillion times I kinda wanna join the cool trend club, but I must resist… and like you said, fast fashion quality is far from great which is another reason to avoid getting caught up in the whirlwind of cheap trendy clothes

      • Lil

        We buy the article of clothing because we like the trend which is literally the article of clothing… aka trend is the clothing aka trend=clothing… Also most people can’t afford to spend hundreds of dollars on a designer good even if it is marked down.

        • Jules

          for sure! for myself personally I just meant I get caught up in the hype of seeing the piece all over and on cool-looking people, whereas I originally didn’t like it or see it as something for myself to buy and wear. but absolutely designer goods are out of reach for so many people, including myself! I guess the important thing is to shop with intention, wherever one buys their pieces (by intention I mean will I wear this for a while, will the quality hold up, do I feel like I need this in my wardrobe etc)

        • Jay

          Joining in this here… well… I do quite some slow fashion, in the sense that I buy basics at armedangels or so… but there is a thing about fast fashion – and that is that it is affordable and fun.

          For me, I know Im gonna wear and love those items one season very very intensely.

          And no, I dont feel bad about it.

          Cause what Ill do is Ill donate them after.

          There is always a women’s shelter, or sth where you can take them to. And they will appreciate them. As your “last season” is their “cool” maybe… and I am so happy when I see them being more confident in themselves cause they get something but the real baggy shirts and pants from services.

          (I actually have a shelter for women who had been subject to all kinds of abuse where I take my things, and they really love reading my old Glamour and Elle Magazines, so I give those to them as well… as well as nail polish I dont like anymore or chocolates I dont fancy…- and I spend about 2 evenings a week with the girls and love how they transform… )

          So my point is: Buying Zara doesn’t kill you or make you a bad person (and H&M actually nowadays – ok they were forced into this – has a really stringent sustainability policy) – enjoy the fun of it – and let others share in the fun of it by donating when you’re done

          (Though certainly, you wanna try to sell the Burberry, dont try to sell the Zara)

    • imeansure

      I don’t love Zara but I don’t agree that you need to love something and plan on wearing it for a hundred years in order to buy it. The thought of saving up to buy a Balenciaga dress as an alternative to fast fashion is honestly quite absurd (for most people’s budgets anyway).

      • Jeanie

        Yah, the price point is not even close. It’s a tricky issue.

      • chouette

        That’s certainly not the only alternative. I think people should wholeheartedly have fun with fashion, just be better informed.

      • Maria

        I agree, i would never be able to buy a Balenciaga dress, even on sale..

    • Mariana Raposo

      THIS!

    • Alice

      Not all of it is made under questionable conditions. I have a lot of pieces produced in Portugal, some in Spain. When the recession hit they still continued to produce in Portugal, which was very important economically especially on a regional level.

      • chouette

        At least in the states those pieces are few and far between, I would say most pieces I’ve seen in the store were made in Bangladesh or Sri Lanka.

        • Alice

          Uhm that’s interesting. I think they must manufacture the same piece in different places.

    • Fereshteh-Faith Oftadeh

      Totally disagree. I don’t die nor chase Zara trends, but nope, I don’t need to save for a Balenciaga dress esp. if I plan on wearing a spandex dress with Loeffler Randall shoes for one night. Yes, fashion is the most wasteful industry in the world and us humans are the most wasteful species in the world, however, maybe the more important question is what makes you happy and what do you want to do about your budget and most importantly, ask yourself what you’re going to end up wasteing. I know for certain I’ll waste any spandex anything and hell no will I buy a balenciaga spandex dress in a million years. I’ve had a Zara wool coat in my jacket closet for maybe six years now and wore it climbing Mt. Whitney in the snow and no, the buttons didn’t fall off and yes it was made in Spain. I don’t think MR did any wrong featuring Zara’s trends esp. since they really have done something right style-wise. And plus nobody is forcing anyone to shop at Zara, it was just an article about trends! Girls, just buy what you like anywhere and think about your closet space if you don’t want to waste but most of all, don’t waste your money on a spandex balenciaga dress!!!

    • ihaveacooch

      every time i’ve gone into a zara, i’m shocked at the terrible quality and the pricing. they charge so much for such poorly made clothing!

      • chouette

        They really know the game of getting people in the door with loss leaders like $4 tank tops and $12 sweaters, but yeah I’m always amazed when I pick up a dress and it’s like $70 for badly hemmed rayon. It ain’t that cheap!

    • Senka

      Balenciaga since Demna has turned into a mockery of fashion, so why invest. If it’s a clothes of the moment, going with Zara is much cheaper option. If we were talking about designers who make more timeless pieces in better fabrics I’d agree, but doesn’t balenciaga go crazy with polyester and absurd styles too?

  • Chelsea LaBelle

    The effortlessness with which you weave both “Boolean” and “sartorial,” two words in verrry different social circles who probably think they’re better than one another, into one neat paragraph is why I love this goddamn brilliant website.

  • B4B

    I have been stalking those plaid, meant to be worn with suspenders, trousers since last summer. Love the androgynous cut. Hopefully the zara version is petite friendly and doesn’t make me look like I’m in my first trimester.

  • Mariana

    I already talked to people about this. I think we live in an era (fashion speaking) that everything is allowed. God forbid you didn’t have a big hair in the 80’s full of volume/curls and you didn’t have a pair of bell-bottom trousers in the 70’s. I think nowadays everything is allowed, everything can be or become a trend. Or, at least, every trend is something that we already see in past seasons, nothing is new anymore but reinvented. Which is not good or bad, it is just what it is and, for me, allows me to not be so fashion-victim about stuff.

  • spicyearlgrey

    noooooooo i thought i had staked my territory in the plaid grandpa slacks section of op shop. am crushed

  • Kim Hammond

    As an older woman Zara offers me the current fashion trends with me feeling afraid to wear them.

  • Mariana Raposo

    Fast-fashion is old fashioned. Man Repeller, you, as an important, relevant and remarkable fashion/style website should use your voice to start talking about sustainable fashion. And I’m sorry, but Zara is not on that list. Get real!

  • Sahil Nanglia

    Hey Zara this is good and awesome hehe….!!!!😉😂

  • country chick farmer

    I only have one comment-when will women realize short pants don’t look good on anyone? Pedal pushers are a necessity for older women like me who no longer are comfortable in shorts but whose personal thermostats seem permanently broken! Thanks again menopause.

  • frannypaul

    I’ve kind of had it with the whole design plagiarism argument. 1. There is nothing new under the sun, 2. Where do runway trends that tie a season together across different designers and continents come from? Is that plagiarism? 3. If I sew a bunch of sequined appliqués onto a Jean jacket or an MC jacket am I plagiarizing Gucci? Or is Alessandro Michele plagiarizing me and my ilk from 1970? (7th grade). Sustainability and ethical labor relations are certainly worthy of attention, but Zara didn’t invent the sweatshop and shouldn’t be singled out when it’s an industry-wide problem. Inditex, not Balenciaga, dresses the masses. And I have 20+ year-old Zara stuff in my closet that I still wear and like.

    • Thank you! My thoughts exactly..this narrative is much too one-sided. It is almost a case of large fashion houses being saints while fast fashion being a devil. There is a place for both in the society and us consumers need to take responsibility for our actions when it comes to sustainable fashion. I too have stuff from Zara & H&M that has lasted me for more than 8 years and at the same time I have stuff from Marc Jacobs which died on me in 2 washes. Expensive does not equal to good quality/better work conditions/sustainably sourced raw materials. A luxury brand sells a vision of luxury, a brand value of prestige and aspiration. Fast fashion sells the possibility for regular janes & joe’s to participate in fashion and not just be content with covering their bodies!

  • Rachel

    So 80’s! Are shoulder pads next? Please say shoulder pads aren’t next!

    • Jay

      Oh, I beg for them not to be back…

  • Fereshteh-Faith Oftadeh

    I had to post this on the feed which was really a response to the person’s comment about Zara and sustainable fashion. MR doesn’t need to get so much shit for doing a simple feature on Zara. Really and seriously.

    There really isn’t a universal definition of what “sustainable practices” really mean but, the assumption that quality and practice equals sustainability is sadly 100% wrong. You can, in fact, have a sustainable clothing company that manufactures clothing (or any other good) that is marketed and used in the most sustainable manner possible thus taking into account both environmental and socio-economic aspects and still produce poor quality goods for an array of reasons such as say, expenses? Budget? Profit? Take this example, manufacturing is the U.S. is almost the most well advanced when it comes to environmental protections although the US’s EPA enforcement has yet to be perfected, it is far more distinguished than countries in Asia, where rivers in garment manufacturing districts are destitute with foamy, poisonous runoff. HOWEVER, there’s a catch: U.S. garment manufacturing is not only much more expensive, because of minimum wage laws, it also has a reputation for fashion industry insiders for being poor quality. There is a large amount of innocent and ethical fashion startups that have fought a financial battle to produce in the U.S. although they very likely received a lot of adverse reactions from their customers for the inconsistent, poor quality goods, such as certain brands featured on Need Supply in my case. As a result and also as a means to survive and keep a job and provide jobs, these companies finally give up and revert their production to countries in Asia like China or Vietnam or Spain or Central America, where higher quality accessories and garments made for a lower prices are actually attainable. Another possibility is they simply found success and can not longer handle New York’s or LA’s manufacturing capacity. Would you call those people contributors to fast fashion or unsustainable? I wouldn’t think that’s really fair, do you?

    Another consideration is that wages in China are actually to a point where it’s midrange, upscale and some “luxury” clothing is being manufactured there. China has actually made the transition and put in the money to invest in reliable technology which is necessary to produce sophisticated quality clothing and other goods. Some larger ethical, sustainable brands struggle with this fact, because they have found there are actually responsible factories there, and yet their customers are bothered at what is perceive as a greedy or unethical choices. Yes, the environmental protections are still not great in China, but if you flip a tag over and see “made in China” you can no longer assume that it represents the bottom of the barrel.

    I think we’ve established already that we don’t, as consumers, always know the most eco-friendly choice. It’s hard to keep up with all the information coming out of the very fast-paced industry. Is Balenciaga good or bad? Is Nike good? what about H&M? Or in this case, the most hated of all, Zara?

    yeah its shocking! fashion contributes to rainforest deforestation? there are actual sweatshops in Los Angeles? Vegan leather can be toxic because its synthetic? Natural fibers can be toxic, too? We have to make ourselves impervious to advertising and seek out the eco-friendly choice…which is well… MUCH easier said than done and thus, pretty unrealistic.

    I just don’t think conscious, sustainable consumerism is a real thing and it just DOES NOT work and there is no alternative. No, Forever21 nor Zara isn’t going to stop selling clothes because of comments on instagram, frankly, they don’t give a fuck about what you think. The power lies with government and multinationals. There’s just no legislation proposed that you can call your representatives about. You can probably try and donate to Greenpeace and NRDC since a small part of their funding attempts to fix fashion, but there’s really nothing else. The only way this will improve is if more companies join the Sustainable Apparel Coalition, the corruption stops within governments in Southeast Asia and those same governments actually invest in infrastructure, Western governments figure out how to incentivize and legislate sustainable fashion practices into the norm, and relevant NGOs start attacking these issues with the same brutality as they’ve done with other environmental issues. What are our incentives? We have capitalists incentives and no incentive for innovation, protection and change in the governmental structure. Nihilistic or not, its the truth.

    Which is all to say, you’re not singlehandedly saving the world with your smart fashion choices and it’s really not a bad thing that Man Repeller featured Zara in one of their posts.

    And on a last and really important note, are you even considering what will happen those women who work in the garment industry in Asia if the US reshored all of it’s manufacturing? Although exploitative, dangerous and unethical as they may be, they are in fact an improvement from rural poverty and forced marriages for a large amount of these women. Those jobs are actually blessings for some – not in every country and not all women – but a large amount that is actually worth considering. Again, what are our incentives? Our incentive should not be to completely abandon Asia entirely, but to somehow figure out how to improve the working conditions and wages in these countries.

  • J. Hall

    These trends are going to BLOW UP, huh? GOOD! They’re horrific!

  • Natalie Redman

    I definitely think cropped plaid trousers will be popular but the others…err no.

    http://www.upyourvlog.com

  • Senka

    Couple of months ago I threw away Zara cropped plaid trousers from 2011 or so. They were size XS, and I could’t wear them anymore without my crotch and stomach suffering, also I wasn’t sure about them anymore. Now I lost a bit of weight during summer and they would fit, but I’ll have to purchase other. moral of the story, don’t throw things away.

    • Jay

      I actually have the opposite: Zara pants fits girls that have wide hips and a medium but – one of my friends can buy them without trying on and they fit perfectly. I have narrow hips and my bootie is pretty small… – comes with being athletic… So… they dont work for me at all.

      But when it comes to high street. Try mango. For some reason many women find their pants fit better, as they are more narrow small or wide bigger…. (both my mom and me find them fitting…)

      By the way, do we wanna start a thing on how clothes from different brands fit?! I would love that…

      • Senka

        Actually I am one of those women with wide hip bones but skinny legs and narrow waist, so Zara works well for me. So does Mango, most days. It’s nordic brands that don’t. They leave that weird empty space between my tush and back, and just don’t fit right. I’d call my self a slim hourglass, and as great as it sounds it’s not easy to dress. At some healthier point of my life I switched to S and even M, but now I’m back to XS.
        Brands and the cuts that fit certain body types would definitely be a good topic! Given, most girls in MR are slim, but it would be great to hear where people go for basics.

        • Jay

          Totally agree… I have a friend who has just the same… like one would need to sew it together or something – cause even with a belt it doesnt look good…

  • Silly You

    Great. I already have $1,000 worth of stuff in my cart in the Zara app. They might as well put a Zara sign over my closet.

  • Jay

    Just a hint: The H&M polka dot blouse on the campaign is awesome. Love the width of the sleeves, and then it is actually tailored on the waist which makes it much nicer than on the campaign pictures.

    Wouldn’t have thought H&M would get down to fitted stuff. But they do. And since they go for size 32 now… Yeah!

    http://tablet.hm.com/qa/product/77822?article=77822-A

    Best thing: The dots are so big and with the tie it‘s extra something… that it‘s just real fun.

  • Gg

    Sooo, Murphy Brown meets Carmen San Diego?