In light of her 50th: the torch of repelling.

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January 6, 2013
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Could my mother be more elegant? I don’t think so. Could her daughter be any more grotesque? Duh.

My friend Rosie said something astute last week in connection to her grandmother who had just passed away. When assessing her demeanor: “She was tough, but never harsh. She was honest, but never offended anyone.” That’s elegance, I thought. Maintaining the ability to practice two opposing character traits and still functioning successfully, as a testament to the greater good of humanity (and, evidently, passing on the torch, albeit, somewhat amended, of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s ideas on intelligence).

My mom can do that, too. I can’t.

In honor of her birthday, I let her wearing The Rectangle that is emblematic of everything she is not for a mere 25 seconds before she articulately suggested, “please remove that block of pearl with your name on it from my head. I’ve just done my hair.”

Okay, mom.

(I’m wearing a 3.1 Phillip Blouse and my clutch is Edie Parker).

 

REPLIES
  • FredAstaire

    Wow, I have been reading your musings and avidly following your man repulsive techniques and tips with righteous copyism in the 100th degree (suitably man repulsive I thought until I myself too, was last year married to an American) – Doh! not working, must be more Vajayjay – like. When I see pictures (or am in the company) of my mum even now at 63 she never fails to look impossibly beautiful and elegant. Which I naturally fight all day long. I think you and I must be kindred spirits Miss, because with genetics like that we obviously are lucky to have the opportunity to man repel with aplomb and still be hideously cute and lovable nonetheless. What I mean to say is, your mum is beautiful, good luck fighting genes like that, you surely have your work cut out for you…

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